If Not for Double Standards, Josh Stein Would Have No Standards

March 25, 2022
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It’s remarkable: Attorney General Josh Stein can in one case argue the legislature has no authority to decide questions of budget and policy, and in another case argue that only the legislature has the authority to decide questions of budget and policy. If not for double standards, Josh Stein would have no standards.

In the Leandro education funding lawsuit, Attorney General Josh Stein believes the judicial branch should have the authority to appropriate $1.7 billion in taxpayer money to a laundry list of pet projects for the education bureaucracy.

But in court today, Stein’s office made the exact opposite argument in a case asking the judiciary to change state laws involving health care policy. The below is from the News & Observer:

Nick Brod, a lawyer from Attorney General Josh Stein’s office who represented the state in Tuesday’s arguments, [said the case is] a question of policy, so any fixes need to be left to the legislature — not the courts. “Health care is one of the most complex, heavily regulated and politically contested markets in our economy,” Brod said. “Everyone disagrees about health care.”

Stein’s office, went on to say that “state leaders must decide ‘how to best design a health care system that balances costs, quality and access, among many other factors.’”

The Attorney General, then, believes health care policy should be decided by the legislature, but not education policy. He can’t have it both ways.

What Attorney General Stein supports: Health care is one of the most complex, heavily regulated and politically contested markets in our economy. Everyone disagrees about health care. State leaders must decide how to best design a health care system that balances costs, quality and access, among many other factors.”

What Attorney General Stein opposes:Education is one of the most complex, heavily regulated and politically contested markets in our economy. Everyone disagrees about education. State leaders must decide how to best design an education system that balances costs, quality and access, among many other factors.”

If not for double standards, Attorney General Stein would have no standards.


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